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Gcse Electronics Coursework Examples Of Simile

In the Remove (Year 10) and the Hundred (Year 11) pupils study a core of compulsory subjects to (I)GCSE: English, Mathematics, Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Religious Studies.  They must then pick at least four subject options. In the Remove, they also continue to study IT and PE as a matter of course (and as distinct from the academic subject options of Computer Science and Physical Education).

Subject Options

In addition to the core, pupils make a choice from a wide range of options: Art, Design Technology, Drama, French, German, Geography, History, Italian, Latin, Mandarin Chinese, Music, Physical Education, Russian and Spanish.

Pupils are required to choose four subject options of which one must be a modern foreign language.  Pupils may also study up to two additional subjects, choosing from Astronomy, Computer Science and Greek.

Length of Courses

(I)GCSE courses are generally run for two years and pupils take their exams at the end of the Hundred year. In the Hundred, pupils no longer take Physical Education or IT.

Subject

Periods per fortnight

REMOVE

HUNDRED

English

6

7

Mathematics 

6

7

Biology

4

4

Chemistry

4

4

Physics

4

4

Religious Studies 

4

4

Information Technology 

1

0

Physical Education

2

0

Option 1

5

5

Option 2 

5

5

Option 3

5

5

Option 4 

5

5

Total

51

50

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Similes – definition

A simile is a figure of speech in which one thing is directly compared with another.

The comparison is usually signalled by the use of the terms ‘as’ or ‘like’ or ‘such as’.


Examples

He was as strong as a lion

It shot out like a bullet

“Music is such sweet thunder”


Use

Similes are part of everyday speech. They may be used consciously or unconsciously.

They are often used in imaginative writing such as fiction and poetry to clarify and enhance an image.

NB! To say that a girl looks like Marilyn Monroe is not a simile. That’s because two similar things are being directly equated to each other.

But to say that ‘My heart is like a singing bird’ is a simile. That’s because the two things being likened to each other are quite different – and so an imaginative comparison is being made.

A simile requires less of an imaginative leap than does a metaphor. A simile states that A is like B, whereas a metaphor suggests that A actually is B.

The simile is one common component of imagery. This is the process of evoking ideas, people, places, feelings and various other connections in a vivid and effective way.

Imagery is used in both written and spoken communication in many varieties of form, from advertising to poetry and from chatting to speech-making.

Simile, metaphor, and symbol are the main types of image making. The result is that communication acquires a creative and vital quality which somehow springs from the essential act of comparison.

So, a raindrop can become a crystal, fear can become an abyss, and jealousy a monster.

By employing imagery, we interpret the material world and use language to transmit our vision.

 

Self-assessment quiz follows >>>

© Roy Johnson 2004


Filed Under: English LanguageTagged With: English language, Figures of speech, Grammar, Language, Similes